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Camp Verde, Arizona

Camp Verde is a town in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. According to 2005 Census Bureau
estimates, the population of the town is 10,155.

The town is located along the I-17 freeway, and as a result most of the local economy involves service stations, restaurants, hotels, and the like. Nearby tourist attractions include Montezuma Castle National Monument and Fort Verde State Historic Park. It is also the site of Cliff Castle Casino, operated by the Yavapai-Apache Nation Indian tribe, making it an important gambling destination for north and central Arizona. The town also host a famous corn festival each year. It is put on by Hauser and Hauser Farms, which operates in Camp Verde.


Geography

Camp Verde is located at 34°34′0″N, 111°51′22″W (34.566713, -111.856194)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 110.3 km² (42.6 mi²). 110.3 km² (42.6 mi²) of it is land and 0.02% is water.

It is in the Verde River valley. To the south lie the Bradshaw Mountains. Camp Verde is surrounded by Prescott National Forest.

The Mogollon Rim is just north of the town and forms the southwestern edge of the large, geologically ancient Colorado Plateau.


Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 9,451 people, 3,611 households, and 2,538 families residing in the town. The population density was 85.7/km² (222.0/mi²). There were 3,969 housing units at an average density of 36.0/km² (93.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 85.05% White, 0.35% Black or African American, 7.31% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 4.70% from other races, and 2.23% from two or more races. 10.94% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,611 households out of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 23.0% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 101.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $31,868, and the median income for a family was $37,049. Males had a median income of $30,104 versus $20,306 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,072. About 9.5% of families and 14.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.2% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

Clarkdale, Arizona


Clarkdale, formerly a heavy-industrial town, is now largely a bedroom and retirement community. Clarkdale
is presently (2007) growing rapidly, with several large new subdivisions under construction.

The Phoenix Cement plant is Clarkdale's sole remaining major industry. The cement plant was built in 1959 to supply Portland cement for the construction of Glen Canyon Dam. Recently enlarged and refitted with advanced pollution-control equipment, Phoenix Cement is owned by the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

Clarkdale is home to the Verde Canyon Railraod, a scenic excursion train that follows part of the route of the Verde Valley Railroad, constructed in 1911-1912 to serve Senator Clark's United Verde Copper Company.

Tuzigoot National Monument, a large Sinagua pueblo ruin, is located between Clarkdale and Cottonwood, Arizona, on land donated to the National Park Service by Phelps Dodge in 1938. Sycamore Canyon Wilderness is located a few miles north of Tuzigoot, and there are many hiking trails and bird-watching areas nearby, in the Coconino National Forest, Dead Horse Ranch State Park, and along the Verde River greenway.



History
Clarkdale was founded in 1912 as a company smelter town for Senator William A. Clark's rich United Verde copper mine, in nearby Jerome, Arizona. Clarkdale was built to be one of the most modern mining towns in the world, and is an early example of a planned community.

The town center and business district were built in an attractive Spanish Colonial style, and feature the Clark Memorial Clubhouse and Memorial Library, both still in use. The Clubhouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The entire original town site is also on the National Register as the Clarkdale Historic District.

The mine and smelter closed in 1953, and Clarkdale entered hard times. Clarkdale was bought and sold by several different companies. In 1957, Clarkdale was incorporated as a town. The 1959 construction of the Phoenix Cement plant restored a modest prosperity to Clarkdale.


Geography
Clarkdale is located at 34°45′40″N, 112°3′17″W (34.761214, -112.054835)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 19.4 km² (7.5 mi²). 19.0 km² (7.3 mi²) of it is land and 0.4 km² (0.2 mi²) of it (2.01%) is water.


Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 3,422 people, 1,433 households, and 994 families residing in the town. The population density was 180.3/km² (466.9/mi²). There were 1,546 housing units at an average density of 81.4/km² (210.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 84.51% White, 0.29% Black or African American, 6.81% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 5.41% from other races, and 2.57% from two or more races. 11.81% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,433 households out of which 22.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the town the population was spread out with 21.5% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 20.4% from 25 to 44, 26.0% from 45 to 64, and 25.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $34,911, and the median income for a family was $41,250. Males had a median income of $28,824 versus $21,811 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,441. About 7.4% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.9% of those under age 18 and 7.0% of those age 65 or over.

Cornville, Arizona

Cornville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. The population
was 3,335 at the 2000 census. The Cornville CDP includes the communities of Cornville and Page Springs.

Cornville and Page Springs are rapidly-growing suburban areas that serve as bedroom communities for nearby Sedona and Cottonwood, Arizona. Both communities are located along scenic Oak Creek, a tributary of the Verde River. Lower Oak Creek has been designated an Important Bird Area by the National Audubon Society. Page Springs hosts the large Page Springs fish hatchery, operated by Arizona Game and Fish. Adjacent to the hatchery are creekside hiking trails and bird-watching areas.


History
"At a meeting of Verde Valley pioneers, one of them said it was the intention to name it Cohnville, for a family named Cohn that lived there. When the papers came back from Washington, they had read it Cornville, so the setlers accepted the name." --Letter, L.J. Putsch Forest Ranger [1]. The Cornville post office was established May 11, 1887.


Geography
Cornville is located at 34°42′58″N, 111°54′36″W (34.716202, -111.909905)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 34.3 km² (13.2 mi²), all land.


Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 3,335 people, 1,311 households, and 895 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 97.3/km² (252.1/mi²). There were 1,441 housing units at an average density of 42.1/km² (108.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 93.22% White, 0.39% Black or African American, 0.84% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 2.70% from other races, and 2.19% from two or more races. 9.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,311 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.7% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 30.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 101.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $36,992, and the median income for a family was $42,333. Males had a median income of $31,567 versus $21,653 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $16,500. About 11.0% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.5% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.

Cottonwood, Arizona

Cottonwood is a city in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. According to 2005 Census Bureau estimates,
the population of the city is 10,894.[1]


Geography
Cottonwood is located at 34°43′56″N, 112°1′7″W (34.732145, -112.018565)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 27.6 km² (10.7 mi²), all land.


Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 9,179 people, 3,983 households, and 2,369 families residing in the city. The population density was 332.1/km² (860.3/mi²). There were 4,427 housing units at an average density of 160.2/km² (414.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.24% White, 0.49% Black or African American, 1.57% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 9.66% from other races, and 2.59% from two or more races. 20.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,983 households out of which 25.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.5% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.5% were non-families. 34.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 23.3% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 23.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 86.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $27,444, and the median income for a family was $37,794. Males had a median income of $24,308 versus $19,977 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,518. About 8.9% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.5% of those under age 18 and 11.3% of those age 65 or over.

Jerome, Arizona

Jerome is a town in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. According to 2006 Census Bureau estimates,
the population of the town is 343.


History
The area around what is now Jerome was mined for silver and copper since the Spanish colonial era when Arizona was part of New Spain.


Mining

A stream, stained turquoise-blue, emerges from a spoil pile of copper oreA mining camp named Jerome was established atop "Cleopatra Hill" in 1883. It was named for Eugene Murray Jerome, a New York investor who owned the mineral rights and financed mining there. Eugene Jerome never visited his namesake town. Jerome was incorporated as a town on 8 March 1889. The town housed the workers in the nearby United Verde Mine, which was said to produce over 1 billion dollars in ore over the next 70 years.

Jerome was reincorporated as a city in 1899 and a building code specifying brick or masonry construction instituted to end the frequent fires that had repeatedly burned up sections of the town previously.

Jerome became a notorious "wild west" town, a hotbed of prostitution, gambling, and vice. On 5 February 1903, the New York Sun proclaimed Jerome to be "the wickedest town in the West".

In 1915 the population of Jerome was estimated at 2,500.


Jerome Deportation

A stamp mill at the mining museumStarting in May of 1917 there was a series of miners strikes, in part organized by the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). On 10 July of that year armed agents of the mine owners roughly rounded up all the labor union organizers and unionized miners on to railroad cattle cars, on 12 July letting them out near Kingman, Arizona after they were warned not to return to Jerome if they valued their lives. This incident is known as the Jerome Deportation.

This event would ultimately serve as a prelude to the larger and more well-known Bisbee Deportation.


Great Jerome Fire
In 1918 fires spread out of control over 22 miles of underground mines. This prompted the end of underground mining in favor of open pit mining. For decades dynamite was used to open up pits in the area, frequently shaking the town and sometimes damaging or moving buildings; after one blast in the 1930s the city jail slid one block down hill intact.

In the late 1920s Jerome's population was over 15,000.


Mining decline and closure

Deserted buildings in the Gold King Mine and Ghost Town, northwest of Jerome.In 1953 the last of Jerome's mines closed, and much of the population left town. Jerome's population reached a low point of about 50 people in the late 1950s.

In 1967 Jerome was designated a Historic District, and a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Modern Jerome: tourism and art

The Main Street of Jerome, ArizonaToday Jerome is a tourist attraction, with many abandoned and refurbished buildings from its boom town days. Jerome is the location of an extensive mining museum, presenting the town history, labor-management disputes, geological structure models, spectacular mineral samples, and equipment used in both underground and open-pit mining.

In 1983, California folk-singer Kate Wolf wrote the song Old Jerome after visiting the town. In 1987 the town council adopted it as their official town song.

Many artists and artisans make, display, and sell their crafts here.

Lake Montezuma, Arizona

Lake Montezuma is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States.
The population was 3,344 at the 2000 census. The Lake Montezuma CDP includes the communities
of Rimrock and McGuireville. Lake Montezuma/Rimrock is presently (2006) the fastest-growing community
' in Yavapai County. The three communities are surrounded by the Coconino National Forest, and are about
20 minutes from the red rocks of Sedona.

Located near the Interstate 17 highway between Phoenix and Flagstaff, Lake Montezuma was named after Montezuma Castle, a cliff dwelling of the Sinagua Indians, now a National Monument. Montezuma Well, a part of Montezuma Castle National Monument, adjoins Lake Montezuma and Rimrock.


Geography
Lake Montezuma is located at 34°38′25″N, 111°47′0″W (34.640283, -111.783377)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 31.0 km² (12.0 mi²). 31.0 km² (11.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.08% is water.


Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 3,344 people, 1,471 households, and 938 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 108.0/km² (279.7/mi²). There were 1,666 housing units at an average density of 53.8/km² (139.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 92.58% White, 0.09% Black or African American, 2.33% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 2.78% from other races, and 2.03% from two or more races. 7.27% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,471 households out of which 20.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.73.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 28.5% from 45 to 64, and 21.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $33,750, and the median income for a family was $36,864. Males had a median income of $22,365 versus $21,538 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $17,043. About 7.2% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.4% of those under age 18 and 1.4% of those age 65 or over.

The Verde Valley:   Camp Verde, Clarkdale, Cornville,
Cottonwood, Jerome, Lake Montezuma
All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License
Rex A. Mazonowicz
Sedona Realty
150 Hwy 179 Suite 4
Sedona, AZ 86336
Office: 928 282 2535
Mobile: 928 607 4351
Fax: 928 282 7029
Rex@SedonaHomesUSA.com
www.SedonaHomesUSA.com